Delaware County
Master Gardeners


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Delaware Master Gardeners are avid about horticulture and eager learners. This site is one way we share these passions and provide "environmentally sound, research-based gardening practices" with our communities.

DCMGA WINS 2021 STATE AWARDS IN 4 CATEGORIES!!

Congratulations to all our winning Master Gardener Volunteers and their projects. We are excited to announce that our Delaware County group of Master Gardener Volunteers swept the awards at the 2021 OSU Extension Annual State Conference!

We all give in so many ways in so many amazing projects, paying forward to our community and to each other. This year, we recognized the following projects, MGVs and Friends of MGVs and we are thrilled that they were acknowledged by the State as being the “best of the best”.

  • Terri Litchfield – Outstanding MGV

  • Native Plant Propagation Project – Outstanding Large MGV Project

  • Pandemic Perseverance Award:

Grace Clinic Project (Barb Butt and Carol Champa)

DCMGA Website (Tech Committee)

  • Stratford Ecological Center – Outstanding MGV Friend

Read More >

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Ask a Master Gardener Volunteer

Answering the public's questions about gardening using science-based information is an important objective of the Ohio State University Extension Master Gardener Volunteer program. Submit your landscape, yard, and garden questions here.

Fall Blooming Native Plants
Terri Litchfield, Native Plant Propagation Committee

Asters and goldenrods are major actors at this time of the year in the native plant garden because of their high value as late season nectar sources for pollinators and migrating butterflies. Goldenrods are represented in three genera, listed here with the number of Ohio native species in each: Solidago (22), Euthamia (2), and Oligoneuron (4). Taxonomically, some of these plants, such as Oligoneuron rigidum (Stiff Goldenrod), have volleyed between these genera multiple times over the years. The Herb Society of America has a great resource on goldenrods, “Essential Guide to Solidago, Notable Native Herb™ 2017: An HSA Native Herb Selection.” Read more HERE.

Likewise, asters fall into multiple genera including Aster, Eurybia, Ionactis, Oclemena, Seriocarpus, and Symphyotrichum. According to the USDA PLANTS Database, there are 36 Ohio native species whose common names include “aster.” One of the most recognizable is New England Aster, Symphyotrichum novae-angliae.

Both goldenrods and asters support over one hundred species of lepidoptera, and are host plants for a number of bee specialists. See Pollen Specialist Bees of the Eastern United States and scroll down to see the large number of times the goldenrod and aster genus names listed above appear. And check out this ODNR Publication to learn more about native plants which support butterflies.

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From The Weed Detective

Nancy Reynolds, Delaware County Master Gardener

I used to have a tree lawn. Then, sewer work tore up the front yard near the road. Last week I realized I no longer have ‘lawn,’ I have a huge patch of Broad-leaf Plantain.

Broadleaf plantain, Plantago major, is a perennial, broadleaf weed that can be found just about anywhere. However, it prefers nutrient rich-soils that are moist and often high in calcium (clay soils are typically high in calcium). Broadleaf plan-tain is a common weed in lawns and landscapes as it can tolerate very low mow-ing heights. It germinates from seed in late spring through the fall depending on temperature and moisture. It has a low growing rosette habit and tolerates close mowing.

It is easily identified by the basal rosette growth habit, but if in doubt, pull up a plant and check to verify that it has a fibrous root system (as opposed to a taproot) and has broad, flat leaves with parallel venation. Leaf margins are “entire” meaning no scalloped or serrated edges. This time of year the plant can also be identified by the long leafless flower stalks standing high above the rest of the plant. The flowers don’t look like flowers at all – they just look weird.

Young plantain leaves are edible as a salad green in the spring. The seeds are considered high in protein. The crushed leaves are also said to eliminate the itch of mosquito bites within sec-onds. However, since my patch is right next to the road in soil of questionable quality (thanks to the aforementioned sewer repair), I think I won’t be eating it any time soon. If you are consider-ing this as a garden edible, there are plenty of sites online selling seed and bare-root plants. OR, you can come dig some up from my tree lawn. Take all you want!

Broadleaf plantain (Plantago major)

See more from the Weed Detective